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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> rose: lakhdar brahimi is here n august he replaced kofi annan as u.s. enjoy to syria, one of the most experienced diplomats in the world. he's deeply familiar with arab affairs. during the 198 0s he was undersecretary general of arab league. in the 1990s he served as algeria's foreign minister. after that he was special envoy to afghanistan and then to iraq post saddal hussein. when he became envoy to syria earlier this year he described his mission as quote nearly impossible. he is in new york this week to report to the united nations and security council on that mission and on the situation in syria. i'm pleased to have him back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you must be exhausted. >> i'm all right. >> rose: what will you say to the united nations. >> you know what, i'm going to tell them what i have been saying all along about the situation in syria is extremely bad. and dangerous. and getting worse. until now nobody has found a way of bringing it under control. we know that this is part of the arab spring. we know that change is coming. but as i think you
now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
and syria. the whole house will be united in concern both at the intolerable situation for the residents of southern israel and the grave loss of life and humanitarian in gaza including the particular impact on children. on the 14th of november, the israeli defense forces began air strikein response to a sharp increase in rocket fire. hamas and other militant groups responded with other rocket fire. as of today, three israeli citizens have been killed and at least 109 palestinians including 33 women and 26 children -- 11 women and 26 children also lled. we have made clear that hamas have the principal responsibility for the start of the current crisis but also that all sides have responsibilities. we quickly called on israel to seek every opportunity to de escalate their militaryesponse and to observe international humanitarian law and avoid civilian casualties. yesterday e.u. foreign ministers condemned the rocket attacks on israel and called for an urgent cessation of hostilities. we have also warned that a ground invasion of gaza could length b the conflict, and erode international su
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
will prepare, considering, no, potentially success of the operation against the facility in syria. and that this may hold iran's restraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are in really concerned with situation, and let me add that people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so, there are two things which must change, diplomacy and inspections. first diplomacy. p5+1 has served as united front. five plus one means to me united nations, security council related, global responsibility to europeans like to prefer 3+3, which means the european union is the main player. i'm a little nervous about if you're in europe you had better say three plus the otherwise you will not be served dinner. [laughter] but i think it is, five plus one of course is important to keep on. but i think u.s. should not do, u.s. does not hide inside this group. u.s. has now time to take responsibility. and to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now, they give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution of 1979. should also the i
of the entire region. syria, and the disorder spills across the neighborhood. joining us again, and fbi supervisory agent. you see that as late? >> what is happening in syria, you have to look at it from a few different perspectives. first you have the syrian people who want freedom from bashar al-assad's regime. then you have regional conflict that is going on. this is between iran and turkey. turkey is supporting the iranian people and iran is supporting the regime. you also have to look at it on a different level. where you have russia and china also involved on global levels with the syrian conflict. it is becoming a war of shadows and a war of different phones. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this
. the problem with that is that syria is a multicultural society. you have the christians and shiites and sunnis so if a civil war took place in syria, with all of these entities fighting with each other, that is still into the entire region. you will see it in lebanon and we will see an indication that the syrian conflict is still into lebanon. also, there is about 20 million involved in the clan and that's that. jenna: this has been going back for centuries. how we engage with that? remapped welcome of, the problem that has been happening today in syria, there is no one to fill the vacuum of bashar al-assad's falling. the new coalition of the opposition -- the syrian opposition, they get together and they elected a leader. that leadership is not a leadership that has been outside syria for 20 years. it is for people who actually were in syria until recently. jenna: there are questions about that leadership and whether it is genuine or whether or not it is the second in command, the muslim brotherhood member is someone that should be looked at again. thomas friedman makes this argument today th
in and out of israeli cities, civilians, and an ammunition dump from weapons coming in from iran, syria, and they're continuing to do that. now no nation, no people and no government could sit idle when, you know, missiles are being shot indiscriminately against civilians. not in london, not in paris and not in washington. >> no rational person would disagree that the rocket firing has got to stop. it is a senseless activity that can only lead to more bloodshed. however, as i said to prime minister netanyahu when i sat down with him in jerusalem last year, this clear repression, oppression, whatever you want to call it on the gaza strip, these people are desperate and when there are desperate people with desperate policy and no hope, they often turn to terrorist groups whether to foment their fury and anger. where does this terrible cycle end? what is the constructive way through this? >> i want to make something perfectly clear. hamas are the enemies of peace. not just the enemies of israel. they are the enemies of peace, regional stability in the region, and to peace both internally o
peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been engaged to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splinters and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assaad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact and obviously israel which is having already grave concerns as we do about, for example, movements of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and they could have an impact not just within syria but on the reas a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legiti
this period? and related to this, as we all know, there is a war -- a civil war happening in syria. iran is a wrote ally of the assad regime. how is that affecting iran yeas security calculations? -- iran's security calculations? are they going to insert that into the p-5 plus one dialogue? how will you answer the questions? >> of course the middle east has stranged. the syrian war and now this confrontation between israel and hamas that somehow brought us back to the middle east that we used to know, the israelis and the arabs going at it and egypt. but right before that iran saw its for turns decline. its popularity in the arab streets declined because of the arab spring, and then the syrian situation has introduced some very, very important elements, almost sectarian element that declined -- that eroded iranian influence in the region and the projection of the iranian power hit a brick wall with that. so all of this of course closed into the mix of what iran is thinking. and this is one of the reasons this is a good time to start negotiating with iran. as its reach in the middle east
of the week. deadly fighting in syria reportedly left at least 63 people dead across the country tuesday, including 41 in the capital damascus. syrian tanks continue to shell the palestinian refugee camp which has seen heavy violence this month. france has become the first western country to recognize syria's newly brokered opposition coalition as the sole representative of the syrian people. the coalition was formed over the weekend at a summit in doma. at least 24 people at and killed and more than 100 wounded in a series of bombings across iraq. a multiple explosions were reported in at least four different areas, including baghdad and kirkuk. israel and palestinian leaders in gaza have agreed to attack -- agreed to a tacit truce following days of violence in the gaza strip. at least seven palestinians have been killed in israeli attacks on gaza since saturday. eight israeli civilians have also been wounded by palestinian rockets. the temporary ceasefire was brokered by the egyptian government, but both sides say they're prepared to resume attacks if it fails. the united nations gener
from syria where ten children are said to have been killed when a cluster bomb landed close to where they were playing. it's not the first alleged use of cluster units by the regime of president bashar al assad. it may be one of the most appalling. >> reporter: these disturbing images show what happens after a children's playground is hit, according to activist, by a cluster bomb. refugees with nowhere else to hide, apparently hit by a single deadly device dropped by a jet. some cluster bombs released smaller explosives to cause maximum devastation against softer targets. what do these children have to do with anything, yells one man? at least ten children killed, according to activist, who said they found the remains of the bomb around the tiny village of deir al assafir. cnn can't verify his pictures or claim that cluster bombs were used. but activist images from the scenes show cluster munitions. but activists say civilians have been hit before when the regime has responded to key rebel successes like at this important air base not far away. >> there is no logic at all attacking s
in 60 minutes n syria, two car bombs exploded in a town near damascus. the number of people wounded and killed is high and rising. at least 45 people, mostly civilians are reported dead. more than 100 injured. the bombs went off in a town known as a refuge for people forced from their homes by this civil war in syria. they weren't the only explosions. two bombs went off at the same time in a residential neighborhood in damascus. we don't know yet how many people are hurt or who is claiming responsibility. this is the wreckage of a syrian air force jet crashed and burning not far from aleppo. rebel fighters claim they shot it down and captured one of the pilots. this is amateur film. a cnn crew was just on the scene after the crash. rebels saying they also shot down a government helicopter yesterday. that captured on video. take a look. an opposition group posted its facebook page that the free syrian army brought down the helicopter with an anti aircraft weapon. we don't know what happened to the people who were actually on board that helicopter. we want to go straight to washington
on the part of anybody, no international organization should listen to any arguments about going into syria or supporting the rebels in syria, in your judgment. >> in the syrian interest story -- first of all, we've got to get our intelligence correct. we don't know exactly what's happened in syria and i don't think we should fight a war on that. as to international organizations, it would be a good idea for us to join one. we are the only nation that has resisted the united nations . >> i only do this because we have a time clock here. great to see you. >> four parts. oliver stone always has an interesting take. >> unboring. >> yes, unboring. it's true. >>> instagram is kachanging the way that we see the world. we'll ask kevin systrom how his photo sharing site ended up [ libe ] le dnkrae ic oha lonn wer. eat moaue sghti ecic evs smeos n usac esi. th emesttso arow douan gw ouenelac w qteuris, lyews urxpur aayhath c dtoou 'sui aesn ard. dti romnd th iserome beusitel tstngen e am. romnd tt usit erti iru. yofe le erisomhi th y'rdog toelsagud ait the idroon d beevit dog go j. >>> there's an
not have the divisions we are facing in syria. i so far there are issues that they are facing but i think we should have hope and faith and i think with the political settlement this should provide a ground for hope in the future. thank you. >> thank you. greg. >> i would like to echo dan in thanking you all for coming out on this very dreary day especially after a holiday for i'm sure many of you. and thanks to you as well for staying up a little late and giving us his great insight. as all of us know, the united states has just been through a presidential election. president barack obama was reelected. and the obama administration had a number of i think foreign policy and counter terrorism successes during the first administration obviously osama bin laden was killed in the special operations raid. president obama has overseen the drawdown of troops in iraq as well as in afghanistan. and yet i think one of the most lasting legacies from the first term of the obama administration may well be what u.s. officials term the yemen model. this is sort of how it is that the u.s. is going to fi
displayed in the face of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria has deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engage with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we have committed to hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they are not splintered and divided in the face of the onslaught from the assad regime. we are in very close contact with countries like turkey and jordan that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are goin
of people in southern syria. an anti-government group claims targeted regime forces in daraa, these pictures were uploaded to the internet today. 11,000 refugees have fled syria in the past 24 hours. most of them to turkey. the united nations says it is the biggest exodus in 20 months of civil war. >>> today is malala day around the world. the united nations planned a day of action honoring a 15-year-old malala yousafzai who was shot by militants while pressing for girls' education in pakistan. her father says she's now beginning to walk, to talk, and to read, which is wonderful news. nearly 90,000 people have signed a petition requesting that malala receive the nobel peace prize. >>> and finally, brace yourself, brace yourself for this last story. it's big. justin bieber and selena gomez are a super couple no more. according to e-online they broke up last week after two years of dating. bieber performed at the victoria's secret show this week. he admits to being a little distracted by the models while he was there. to which his friends responded, you think? that is the news. now back to les
, syria, the islamic republic of iran and the united states of america. well, harold coe says, what a disgrace. how can the united states be a world leader on women's rights and not sign this treaty? well, let's take a look. what would radification mean? we don't have to guess what ratification means. the american bar association has written a book-length report, 200 pages, explaining exactly what american compliance would mean. the aba report is based on the work of the u.n. monitoring committees. they go to the countries when they ratify the treaty. so when they went to britain or australia or canada, they wrote a report. what were they telling these countries to do, how would you follow the treaty? well, the aba report opposes thousands of questions, all of them potential lawsuits. the aba claims, first of all, it's not about equality under the law, it's about de facto equality; that is, equality of result, statistical equality. the aba states gender quotas are not voluntary, it creates an obligation for a quota system. so i'm just going to run through a few of these questions fr
by jordan, egypt, lebanon, syria and iraq. but the fledgling country survived. the u.n. passed resolution 194 in december 1948 which allowed ref are geez who wished to live peacefully the right to return home at the earliest practical date. nearly 20 years later in 1967, israel pre 'em tifl struck egyptian forces after the access was blocked to the port. israel gained control over areas including the west bank and gaza strip and east jerusalem. for arabs, this was the beginning of a period of occupation by israel which remains at the center of today's conflict. now, there would be another air rob israeli war in 1973. before that, there's the formation of the plo or the palestinian liberation organization which would be defined by the likes of yasir arafat. in 1978, u.s. president jimmy carter helped to broker the peace accords between saadat of egypt and prime minister ba begin of israel which paved the way for the 1979 peace treaty between those two countries. the lalt '80s saw the formation of hamas in the west bank and gaza erasing hopes. the oslo accords signed -- establishing recogni
pouring into syria as we speak, as well as libya, iraq, etc. >> greta: what did she say? >> she said, well, maybe i should have said core, that we have decimated core al-qaeda. well, first of all, that's a directly vastly different from what she actually said. number two is that really is kind of meaningless to take out core al-qaeda. but again, i want to emphasize many of these questions are right at the doorstep of the president of the united states. why did he on the 25th, two weeks later, talk to the united nations about hateful videos? why is he that he told "60 minutes" that he did not know what was the cause of the attack on benghazi when he claimed in the debate with mitt romney that he had called it a terrorist act at the white house, which he had not done so. he continued to go on various shows talking about hateful videos and not knowing -- >> greta: entertainment shows i might add. for the most part entertainment shows. all right. in terms of what she did tell you -- i saw a cbs reported that i posted on gretawire.com under the headline on who's on first, which can no one decid
on this. who benefits from this is syria and spotlight . syria gets the spotlight off and iran makes the weapon program excel. >> but a lot of people are putting the iranians behind hamas on this. hamas is alienated themselves from the iranians and moved out of sir yampt hamas always would have preferred to work with sunni than shiia and now they have those people to work with and all of the arms they want coming out of libya and tunisia after the arab spring. the reliance on the iranians is much less. >> brian: they sided with the syrian rebels and hesbollah sided with the syrian government. very complicated. great analysis. >> thank you, sir. >> brian: we move on on the run down. the camera was rolling in the moment of immingpact. >> look at that. >> brian: wow. the story behind the video next. candidate obama made this promise to the nation's heroes. >> no veteran should have to wait months or years for the benefits that you earned. >> brian: but the next guest said the president has not delivered. his story will blow you away. my friend told me about a great new way to get deals.
, especially given recent evidence that their shipments to syria and elsewhere? >> with respect to north korea -- they would have to demonstrate a series of meeting their data goal of denuclearization. we have engaged with the north normal basand is. we have not seen the steps. we have laid out what they need to do in terms of that kind of demonstration of seriousness with respect to denuclearization. have not seen that from them. there is an interesting question about burma. and the united states and embrace ofbama's their reform efforts and support for it. in no other way that you can imagines is an entry by berman into the international community is what comes of that and the opportunity that it provides. economically. that is an important focus of the burmese leadership. the economic prospects and promises of their coming into the international community and supported by the u.s. that is a path that if the north koreans would address the nuclear issue, that would be available to them. we have said that from the outset. it is an important example for them to contemplate. it is a regime that
to worse, the brutality in this war unfolding in syria. what's the latest? >> reporter: absolutely. what you're referring to, wolf, is this cluster bomb to the east of damascus which now human rights watch having studied activist video heard from activists on the ground pretty certain cluster bombs were used. they say it looks like soviet -- they say witnesses say there was no specific rebel target in the area around there which they could have been aiming at. and of course applying pressure for the world to stop using cluster munitions specifically here of course for the syrian regime to stop hitting civilian targets, wolf. >> and the brutality is really unbelievable. about 40,000 people so far have been killed in this war over the past year and a half. who knows how many have been injured or made homeless, refugees streaming into syria, jordan, other countries in the region. is there any positive signs whatsoever that this may be coming to an end any time soon? >> reporter: well, of course there's two different sides to that. the fear with the cluster bombs as the regime get put on the
erupted in 2003 to a broad degree, and that now includes syria in turmoil, really in a deep civil war, egypt having had the revolution and change of government. jordan. there was, of course, the conflict in gaza in 2008, and the daenk now if it is, it could be spread. not just to israelis and palestinians, but if you had a conflict that spread throughout the region, it could be hugely destabilizing and costly to everyone involved. >> i think the president is on the right course. it's trying to use all the allies to encourage both parties to step back from an escalation of the conflict. that's very difficult. israel has the right to defend itself against the barrage of rockets that have accelerated dramatically in recent days and no doubt will do so wanting to deter such action in the future. the problem is if this escalates that, could have devastating consequences for all concerned, so it's a tension there trying to accomplish one objective without having it reverse and cause greater damage in the future. >> talk about the role of the arab spring here, because obviously, you have a d
considering potential success of the operation against the facility in syria. and this will all remove iran's constraints to acquire nuclear weapons. so we are either -- really concerned with the situation. let me add people of iran will continue to suffer under very tough sanctions. so there are two things which must change. diplomacy and the inspections. first diplomacy. five plus one has served the purpose of the it united front. five plus one mean to me united nations security council related global responsibility, europeans like to prefer three plus three which means the european union is the major player. i'm nervous about that, if you are europe you had better say three plus three otherwise you will not be served your dinner. five plus one, of course, it is important to keep on. i think u.s. should not do what it has done, hide inside this group. u.s. has now tried to take responsibility. to change, to start with its relations with iran. isn't it time now to sort of give up on the occupation of the u.s. embassy in connection with islamic revolution 1979? should the iranians try to fo
's dealing with syria gaza, the congo. she's still our representative to the united nations. so while we're talking this foolishness about her appearance on a tv talk show, what signal is that sending to the rest of the world? i do think they've got themselves backed in a corner now. i think the other agenda going on is the senate race. so i think that it needs to stop. i hope it will today. i know she's back on the hill again today. >> bill: she is. first of all, it is unfair at so many levels. i think it is sexist and racist. ambassador to the united nations, god knows is not responsible for security. embassies and consulates around the world number one. we talked about this earlier. number two, all she did in her appearance on the sunday shows and in her testimony right after the incident in benghazi on the hill was say here is what our intelligence agencies are telling us at this point. we don't know everything about it yet. you know. and that's -- that's kind of classic. you never know, right? immediately, al
it be in the middle east which you read about everyday, whether it be syria, whether it be iran, pakistan. the sunni-shia fault lines in the middle east, where there be out in the pacific in china. we look at what is going on with the islands within the pacific, korea and 29-year-old leader in charge of korea. what is he going to do in the future? we have narcoterrorism and transnational narco-terrorism. what does that mean to the future and security of our country? i don't know. these are questions we have to take a look at and these are questions that we have to be prepared to operate in. the other thing that i have learned frankly the hard way over the last several years is that you also have what i call opportunists, who will try to take advantage of this instability in destabilizing influence and nascent governments are failing governments and these opportunists may be unpredictable. i always use iraq as an example. there are lots of opportunists in iraq, iran, turkey, saudi arabia and nonstate actors all opportunists trying to take advantage of the situation. how does that project itself aroun
suspect we will get to is syria. . . hour. [no audio] >> should a side lose control in syria or hezbollah try to obtain them. i can't, and you guys are the experts, you i can't remember a time of more moving parts in the middle east puzzle than right now on this day, so much is now, and they are all, of course, interconnected. hamas is testing israel. israel is testing egypt. there's more uncertainty than ever about syria, its relationship with iran, whether it can hold lebanon together, what is hezbollah doing now that its backers are in their own fights inside syria. the evolving role of qatar and saudi arabia, and turkey playing a role. it's enormous. of anything at the security conference, this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i'm reminded of bob dylan's favorite song, "along the watchtower," and that should be our anthem this morning. there must be a way out of here so let's aim for some relief and less confusion, and i want to propose the following format just for the beginning of this panel, and then i think i want to open it up to a lot of questions from the floor
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)